Nature Trust of New Brunswick

Canadian-American partnership conserves major sea cliff on Grand Manan

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Monday, Jan. 13, 2014 (Grand Manan, NB) In the days before Christmas a landmark conservation gift permanently protected a significant coastal property known as Seven Days Work Cliff on the beautiful island of Grand Manan in the Bay of Fundy. The Nature Trust of New Brunswick (NTNB) and a US charity called American Friends of Canadian Land Trusts (American Friends) formed a unique partnership that made this “cross-border” donation of land in the province possible.  Cross-border conservation conserves ecologically important Canadian land that is owned by preservation-minded Americans. At 23.8 hectares, Seven Days Work Cliff is best known for its spectacular sea cliffs that are home to birds of prey and a popular trail that overlooks the Bay.

“Much of the island’s coastline is privately owned and is being rapidly developed,” says Renata Woodward, Executive Director of NTNB. “The conservation of Seven Days Work Cliff means another natural area has been put aside for nature, as well as for residents of Grand Manan and visitors to enjoy for years to come.”

Located on the northeastern section of the island between Whale Cove and Ashburton Head, Seven Days Work Cliff consists of a highly visible and spectacular 80 metre sea cliff, as well as wetland and other natural vegetation. It is also an ideal place to see the birds of prey that nest and hunt along the cliff. The beloved cliff-top “Red Trail”, managed by the Grand Manan Trails Association and used by residents and visitors, also traverses the land.

“Grand Manan is a beautiful and environmentally fragile New Brunswick gem. Protecting its special landscapes is a high priority for NTNB, but land there is very expensive, especially if it has an ocean view,” says Woodward. “We are thrilled that the Americans who owned Seven Days Work Cliff wanted to conserve their property and were willing to donate it.”

NTNB formed the innovative partnership with American Friends to make this generous gift legally and financially feasible.  American Friends now owns the donated property and NTNB will manage it as part of their network of nature preserves.

“Seven Days Work Cliff is a perfect demonstration of why Canadian land trusts created American Friends,” says Sandra Tassel, Program Coordinator for the Seattle-based organization. “Americans own priority conservation lands in many of Canada’s most scenic and ecologically sensitive places. We find that these landowners truly cherish their properties and are willing to give the land for preservation purposes if tax and legal obstacles can be overcome. The partnership between the Nature Trust and American Friends to protect Seven Days Work Cliff is a great example of what can be achieved through cross-border donations. We hope this will be the first of many New Brunswick projects.”

The features of the property inspired all of the parties involved in the pioneering project. The cliffs are a geological wonder, containing layers of rock formed during the enormous volcanic event that filled the Bay of Fundy with basaltic lava 201 million years ago. Today, the boulder-strewn beach below the cliffs attracts rock hounds who come to collect fine specimens of volcanic zeolites, quartz, jasper, agate and other minerals that fall from the cliff as it slowly erodes.

Seven Days Work Cliff is the 37th nature preserve managed by NTNB in the province and the third on Grand Manan.

Many generous contributions have been made to the project, including the land donors (who wish to remain anonymous), American Friends of Canadian Land Trusts, Davis Conservation Foundation, Grand Manan Trails Association, The William P Wharton Trust, EcoAction, and anonymous donors.

Contact

The Nature Trust of New Brunswick
404 Queen St. 3rd floor
P.O. Box 603, Station A
Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A6
Canada
Phone: (506)457-2398
Fax: (506)450-2137
Email:naturetrust@ntnb.org

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